My name is Kris Nair and I'm an entrepreneur turned venture capitalist turned business-designer.
My work moves around the intersection of technology, design, architecture, venture capital, psychology, economics and applied physics. I work with startups and large corporations on business design and future design.
In my work, it starts with ideas. It starts with design. It starts with writing. It starts with strategy.
In my work, It starts with getting started.
"You will not have wealth, you will not be rich but you will have respect, you will be the soldier of this great Army." — Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw

"You will not have wealth, you will not be rich but you will have respect, you will be the soldier of this great Army." — Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw

Suppose you develop a new technology that is valuable to some industry. The old approach was to sell or license your technology to the existing companies in that industry.

The new approach is to build a complete, end-to-end product or service that bypasses existing companies.

Andreessen Horowitz’s Chris Dixon, Balaji Srinivasan and Benedict Evans discuss the reasons behind, and advantages of, going “full stack.”

We love ourselves to the point of idolatry; but we also intensely dislike ourselves

Every fully developed religion exists simultaneously on several different levels. It exists as a set of abstract concepts about the world and its governance. It exists as a set of rites and sacraments, as a traditional method for manipulating the symbols, by means of which beliefs about the cosmic order are expressed. It exists as the feelings of love, fear and devotion evoked by this manipulation of symbols.

And finally it exists as a special kind of feeling or intuition — a sense of the oneness of all things in their divine principle, a realization (to use the language of Hindu theology) that “thou art That,” a mystical experience of what seems self-evidently to be union with God.

The ordinary waking consciousness is a very useful and, on most occasions, an indispensable state of mind; but it is by no means the only form of consciousness, nor in all circumstances the best. Insofar as he transcends his ordinary self and his ordinary mode of awareness, the mystic is able to enlarge his vision, to look more deeply into the unfathomable miracle of existence.

The mystical experience is doubly valuable; it is valuable because it gives the experiencer a better understanding of himself and the world and because it may help him to lead a less self-centered and more creative life.

In 1958, five years after his transcendent experience induced by taking four-tenths of a gram of mescalin, Aldous Huxley — legendary author of Brave New World, lesser-known but no less compelling writer of children’s books, modern prophet — penned an essay titled “Drugs That Shape Men’s Minds.” 

In Moksha: Aldous Huxley’s Classic Writings on Psychedelics and the Visionary Experience (public library) — a selection of Huxley’s fiction, essays, and letters titled after the Sanskrit word for “liberation.” In the essay, Huxley considers the gifts and limitations of our wakeful consciousness, our universal quest for transcendence, and the interplay of drugs and democracy.

Here: A Rare, Prophetic 1958 Interview by Mike Wallace

We admire things we don’t understand, 

We admire things we don’t understand, 

Climb the mountain so you can see the world, not so the world can see you.
Steve Jobs on the disease of believing that 90% of the work is having a great idea
{thanks mitensampat}

Steve Jobs on the disease of believing that 90% of the work is having a great idea

{thanks mitensampat}


These Norwegian Air Force guys had basically seen a spaceship land in their field. The commanding officer came to us and asked “What do you need?” I told him, “A telephone and a beer.”

— 
Former Lockheed SR-71 ‘Blackbird’ pilot Rick McCrary relates his experiences flying the world’s fastest-ever jet, including an engine fire 72,000 feet above snow-laden Norway.

These Norwegian Air Force guys had basically seen a spaceship land in their field. The commanding officer came to us and asked “What do you need?” I told him, “A telephone and a beer.”

— 

Former Lockheed SR-71 ‘Blackbird’ pilot Rick McCrary relates his experiences flying the world’s fastest-ever jet, including an engine fire 72,000 feet above snow-laden Norway.

Jerome Street, Once upon a time, 

(via hansbrinker)

  • Yuri Orlov: You read the newspapers, Vit?
  • Vitaly Orlov: Newspaper? It's always the same.
  • Yuri Orlov: You're right. Every day there's people shooting each other. You know what I do when I see that? I look to see what guns they're using and I think to myself, why not my guns?